Are You a Servant Leader or a Leadership Warrior?

Leadership Warrior

I have recently called upon the leaders of the world to start a LEADERSHIP REVOLUTION (Post 1) (Post 2). In order to make my dream become a reality, we need to employ some proactive, aggressive action right away.

Calling All Leaders

One of the most common terms used for good leadership these days is SERVANT LEADERSHIP. Although I am a proponent of that concept and completely accept that servant leadership is wonderful methodology, I am afraid that it may be lulling a lot of the world’s leaders into a reactive, rather than proactive state.

Some leaders use the term SERVANT LEADERSHIP as a reason to reduce the amount of genuine leadership activities they perform. They allow their followers to take the lead and they shy away from assertive, hands-on leadership work.

They can tend to serve, but they do not lead.

Real Servant Leadership

SERVANT LEADERSHIP is not about serving…it is about leading! Always remember that leaders must perform in outstanding ways in order to set the example for everyone watching.

If you want to bring your organization to higher level of performance, you need to start a LEADERSHIP REVOLUTION and become a LEADERSHIP WARRIOR right away. If there are any areas of your organization that are not performing to your preferred benchmark, you need to change your approach to leadership so that you can start building a brighter future.

You need to start fighting for your right to be a great leader and build a leadership movement that will have your followers rallying around you.

Gaining Support

We all know that one rotten apple can spoil the entire barrel. If there is one person or one department in your organization that is operating in less than stellar fashion you need to go to them and boldly state that you have started a LEADERSHIP REVOLUTION and that you want unanimous support.

Let them know that the personnel carrier you are driving into battle has room for everyone but it cannot afford any roadblocks or detours on the road to success.

TAKE CHARGE…BE BOLD…BE A LEADERSHIP WARRIOR!

New Challenges

As you travel across the battlefield of your LEADERSHIP REVOLUTION you will find casualties. In fact, you might even have to create some casualties in order to achieve the level of performance you require.

Make no mistake though…the survivors will carry you forward and they will bring new recruits to fill the gaps left by those who fell along the way. And, don’t stop at leading the people you have now! You want to be known as the leader that almost everyone wants to follow.

YOU WANT TO BECOME THE EMPLOYER OF CHOICE…AND THE LEADER OF CHOICE!

Quick Questions:

~ As you are reading this, ask yourself the following question:

“Is my organization the EMPLOYER OF CHOICE in its field?”

~ And then ask yourself this:

“Am I the BEST LEADER there is in my field?”

If you were forced to honestly answer NO to either of those questions, you have some work to do and you are probably not a LEADERSHIP WARRIOR yet! You might be a nice person and you might even be a servant leader, but you are not a warrior and your revolution has probably not begun.

Instead, you are just getting by…you are in survival mode!

Warning! Danger!

The danger in just getting by or simple survival is that your workers are watching you and they might decide to start their own revolution to overthrow you in your weakened state.

In that event, even if your organization survives the battle, you might not.

The other imminent threat is of course, that your competitors or your enemies are always looking for cracks in your armour that will allow them to do grievous harm to you and your followers. Keep your armour clean and your weapons sharp by always leading with integrity!

Becoming a Leadership Warrior

Once you become a LEADERSHIP WARRIOR, your army will grow from within and you will be overrun with new recruits. You will be moving toward a reputation as a passionate, charismatic leader that the world will follow.

Think about some of the great leaders of history”

  • George Washington
  • General Douglas MacArthur
  • Abraham Lincoln
  • Winston Churchill
  • Jesus Christ
  • Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Mahatma Gandhi
  • Colin Powell

Every one of them was a warrior for their cause…and every one of them served their people boldly with no concern for themselves.

Servant Leader or Leadership Warrior?

These terms are not mutually exclusive. The best leaders are servant leaders who fight for their cause. They are best of the best and they never rest until their revolution is won.

MY LEADERSHIP REVOLUTION HAS BEGUN!
WHO WILL JOIN ME?

I look forward to seeing you on the battlefield!

——————–
Wayne Kehl is President and CCO at Dynamic Leadership Inc
He is author and behavioral analyst who lectures on leadership and motivation
Email | LinkedIn | Twitter | Web | Blog | Book

Image Sources: dragoart.com

Advertisements

6 responses to “Are You a Servant Leader or a Leadership Warrior?

  1. Wayne,
    Great post. Isn’t it all about pendulum swings and contextualization? It reminds me of an interview I saw once of Alice Cooper who said that he chose his raunchy rebellious style as a deliberate marketing strategy. He saw that the peace-loving flower children motif was getting old. So, the same is true of servant leadership and other calls from the 1970s for a more sensitive leader. Have we come full circle back to the authoritarian style of the 1950 and 60s? Or will we find some sort of synthesis leadership model that is both? How interesting that in the Bible, the One I consider the greatest leader of all time, Jesus Christ, is referred to as both a lamb and and lion. Hmmmm.

    Like

  2. Hey Greg

    I love the “lamb and lion” analogy.I think all of the great and well-remembered leaders of history have been lambs and lions! Jesus certainly was! My goal is to complete the circle to make leadership a bold and noble calling where humility and courage trump money and status every time.

    Thanks for your comments!

    All the Best!
    Wayne

    Like

  3. Hi Wayne
    Your battlefield analogy runs well with my own ethically based approach to Leadership, and as a former Royal Marines Commando, who has honed his skills under combat, but now choose to’nlighten’ corporates, I find it increasingly tiresom and feel it is a cop out, ‘Leaders’ taking the easy way out and calling it servant leadership.
    A true servant Leader, such as Nelson Mandela, Ghandi, Dr King do not se theselves and proclaim I am a leader and I am serving you, so therefore you can be my buddy, follow me.
    Those that get it truly serve humanity, not a Company, or a team, or even their own department.
    It is something that is part of their everyday life.
    I feel I need to express my Leadership ideas and strategy to a wider audience, and shake some of the ivory towers that make a lot of noise, have grand ideals and policy documents, mission statement then do what they need for themselves. but at what cost, true Leadership is not something that you can switch on and off as you step through the door.

    Like

    • Hi Gary,

      Nice comments! If you would like to have your voice heard, you may wan tot consider becoming a contributing Author here on Linked 2 Leadership. Just let me know and I can get you going. I would love to have you join the global conversation!

      ~Tom

      Like

  4. Hi Gary
    I think this might have struck a chord with a lot of leaders, which explains why the majority of workers do not want to become managers… Thanks for commenting!
    Cheers
    Wayne

    Like

  5. Pingback: High Performance Leadership Part I: Learning About Leadership « On Language·

Please Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s